Pedestrians walk around and dine on East Kirkwood Avenue June 19 during a weekend shutdown of the street to allow more space for socially distanced outdoor dining and drinking. The exit of many Indiana University students in March due to COVID-19 restrictions has hurt many local businesses. (Bobby Goddin / Herald-Times)
Pedestrians walk around and dine on East Kirkwood Avenue June 19 during a weekend shutdown of the street to allow more space for socially distanced outdoor dining and drinking. The exit of many Indiana University students in March due to COVID-19 restrictions has hurt many local businesses. (Bobby Goddin / Herald-Times)
A personal finance technology company has ranked Bloomington as the most economically vulnerable college town in America during the COVID-19 pandemic.

New York City-based SmartAsset pulled data for U.S. cities with a population of at least 50,000 and at least one four-year college or university. That list was then narrowed to 95 college towns where students made up 10% or more of the population.

Six metrics were then used to determine which college towns are the most dependent on the presence and spending habits of undergraduate populations.

While the methodology isn’t perfect, it’s not bad, said Ryan Brewer, associate professor of finance and MBA director at Indiana University-Purdue University Columbus.

“Is Bloomington at risk?” Brewer said. “The answer has got to be yes.”
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